July 4th Parades Are Right-Wing

Discussion in 'Happy Hour' started by Bart, Jun 30, 2011.

  1. Bart

    Bart Hall of Famer

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    When I was younger I loved the 4th of July and all the hoopla surrounding it. Of course, the USA is a much different country than it was years ago, everything has been turned upside down. I'm sure many older folks still feel a great affinity for the flag. It is very understandable. Most of them live in the past watching Andy Griffith reruns and old John Wayne movies.

    When they salute the stars and stripes they are looking back to a time when America truly was a shining light. Not perfect by any stretch but still quite wonderful in many ways.

    I guess the writers of the piece below see the parades as representing the old values too, which they most certainly despised.

    I don't think they'd have a problem with celebrating Cinco De Mayo, MLK day, Juneteenth, or any other B.S. like that.

    http://www.usnews.com/news/blogs/washington-whispers/2011/06/30/harvard-july-4th-parades-are-right-wing

    Harvard: July 4th Parades Are Right-Wing
    By Paul Bedard

    Posted: June 30, 2011

    Democratic political candidates can skip this weekend's July 4th parades. A new Harvard University study finds that July 4th parades energize only Republicans, turn kids into Republicans, and help to boost the GOP turnout of adults on Election Day.

    "Fourth of July celebrations in the United States shape the nation's political landscape by forming beliefs and increasing participation, primarily in favor of the Republican Party," said the report from Harvard. [See political cartoons about the 2012 GOP field.]

    "The political right has been more successful in appropriating American patriotism and its symbols during the 20th century. Survey evidence also confirms that Republicans consider themselves more patriotic than Democrats. According to this interpretation, there is a political congruence between the patriotism promoted on Fourth of July and the values associated with the Republican party. Fourth of July celebrations in Republican dominated counties may thus be more politically biased events that socialize children into Republicans," write Harvard Kennedy School Assistant Professor David Yanagizawa-Drott and Bocconi University Assistant Professor Andreas Madestam.
     
  2. mattharper

    mattharper Guru

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    Good job Bart. Unfortunately I think a few members on this site have this gun nut paranoid feeling going on here. Yes the country is headed in the wrong direction but it aint gonna happen in out lifetime.
     
  3. Anak

    Anak Mentor

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    What's not going to happen?
     
  4. mattharper

    mattharper Guru

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    Thus the term paranoid Anak. I hope Im wrong though.
     
  5. Anak

    Anak Mentor

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    Okay, but what's not going to happen?
     
  6. mattharper

    mattharper Guru

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    I dont think theres going to be Anarchy in the streets. As pro white as I am forgive me for saying not all blacks and hispanics are evil. Conversely sa much as I am against abortion I wish all poor black and Hispanics should not be allowed to have more than 1 child. Al they do is create more poor criminal babies. And for every one hispanic or black that makes it out of the ghetto 2 more get sent to prison. Its never going to get better but I odnt see the world collapsing just yet.
     
  7. DixieDestroyer

    DixieDestroyer Hall of Famer

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    Matt, when I celebrate Independence Day...I'm celebrating that America of 1776 & the Founding Fathers...not the Globalist Elite co-opt'd AmeriKa (v 2.0) of today. As for when our Republic will be collapsed...I certainly hope & pray it's not in our lifetime (as you stated), but things are not looking good.[​IMG]
     
  8. mattharper

    mattharper Guru

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    Dixie you are a great american. Noone can predict the end of the world but as I said as bad as things are I just dont think its going to happen anytime son. I know this sounds horrible but whenever I hear on the news a bunch of MExicans or blacks are killed I kind of rejoice as it means a slightly less percentage whites will be afflicted by these idiots.
     
  9. Anak

    Anak Mentor

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    So you don't think Americans are going to get wild in the streets within our lifetimes?

    I don't know, the book "Civil War II" made a strong case to the contrary, but the racial indoctrination programs seem to be going better than expected and most American Whites think we're all just one big ol' happy melting pot and would be ever so offended at anyone who thought otherwise.
     
  10. screamingeagle

    screamingeagle Mentor

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    Isn't that the point of the 4th of July parades.
     
  11. Run Stuffing LB

    Run Stuffing LB Mentor

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    It's already happening, right now. The negro swarm attacks against Whites that this summer will be remembered for represent a new phase of the collapse and it's now pretty clear that the central authority is both helpless and delusional about what's taking place.
     
  12. DixieDestroyer

    DixieDestroyer Hall of Famer

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    If not for brave men as these, they'd have never been a Constitutional Republic.

    Never too late: Declaration signers being honored

    APBy KATHY McCORMACK - Associated Press | AP â€" 15 hrs ago

    CONCORD, N.H. (AP) â€" It's William Whipple's turn to be recognized.

    The New Hampshire merchant is one of the lesser-known signers of the Declaration of Independence. This year, there are plans for Whipple and 11 others to be honored for their place in history with a small bronze plaque at their gravesites or homes, thanks to a group of descendants of the Founding Fathers.

    Whipple, one of three men from New Hampshire who signed the famous document â€" the others were Josiah Bartlett and Matthew Thornton â€" had no direct descendants. His only child, a boy, died as an infant and is buried near him at the Old North Cemetery in Portsmouth. Whipple, who also commanded troops during the Revolutionary War and served as a state judge and legislator, died in 1785 at age 55.

    It's about time he was honored, said Blaine Whipple in Portland, Ore., a distant relative who has researched and published several volumes on 15 generations of the Whipple family in America.

    "He was one of the workhorses of the Continental Congress," Whipple said. "He's never been given the credits that he earned." Whipple was chairman of the marine, foreign relations and quartermaster committees and served on another committee that gathered intelligence on the British, he said.

    Whipple's gravesite mentions he was a member of the Continental Congress when America declared its freedom from Great Britain, but doesn't spell out his famous moment in time. The 104-year-old Society of the Descendants of the Declaration of Independence wants to change that for Whipple and the other signers, "to honor their memory and their great deed."

    "We try to do as many as we can, but it's a long process," said Grace Staller of West Chester, Pa., who heads the project for the nonprofit group. She's a ninth-generation descendant of signer John Hart from New Jersey, whose plaque is at the Old Baptist Meeting House in Hopewell.

    The Portsmouth City Council recently approved the request. The city owns the cemetery.

    Other plaque recipients â€" some better known than others â€" this year are John Adams, Samuel Adams, John Hancock, and Robert Treat Paine, Massachusetts; Charles Carroll, Maryland; Thomas Jefferson and Thomas Nelson, Virginia; Thomas Lynch and Arthur Middleton, South Carolina; James Smith, Pennsylvania; and Richard Stockton, New Jersey.

    Some of the 56 signers, like Whipple, have no direct descendants. For others, it's not clear where they're buried. Some cemeteries don't allow the plaques. In addition to the 45 who will end up with plaques, there are 11 signers who won't be getting them; they will be honored at the historic Congressional Cemetery in Washington.

    The bronze plaque quotes from the last sentence of the 1776 document, saying for the support of the declaration, "we mutually pledge to each other our lives, our fortunes and our sacred honor."

    "I've always been proud to be related to a signer of the Declaration of Independence. It's almost like a royal family," said Jeffrey Saurman of Portsmouth, a direct descendant of Thornton, whose memorial in Merrimack received one of the plaques last August. He said he was happy to share the moment with his children.

    His son Josh, he said, recently completed a report on Thornton, a doctor, state representative and judge, for his sixth-grade class. The youngster took a photo of himself in period clothes next to a portrait of Thornton. "You could see some resemblance," his father said.

    Saurman, who works at a family plumbing and heating business, said he was shocked and surprised that the plaques hadn't been made years earlier. "You would think something like that would've already been done."

    William Whipple, who was born in Kittery, Maine, was a merchant in Portsmouth, a busy seaport and shipbuilding city. During the Revolutionary War, he was brigadier general of the New Hampshire Militia and was one of the negotiators of the surrender of British Gen. John Burgoyne at the Battle of Saratoga, a major turning point in the war.

    Whipple kept a diary from that time, musing about how long it took for preparations to bring back Burgoyne so he could be sent back to Britain.

    "He talks about Burgoyne holding them all up, and he wouldn't leave because he had to get his whole entourage together," said Barbara McLean Ward, curator of the Moffatt-Ladd House in Portsmouth, Whipple's home. The weather was fine, but when they finally left Saratoga, "it rained the entire time back ... It's all about sort of being miserable," she said.

    Whipple freed his slave, Prince Whipple, who had fought with him in the war and was one of a group of slaves who had petitioned the Legislature for their freedom. Prince Whipple also is buried in the Old North Cemetery.

    The Moffatt-Ladd House, a Georgian mansion built in 1763, is a national historic landmark that's open to the public. It has a portrait of Whipple, as well as some personal items, such as a sword. Outside the house is a 235-year-old horse chestnut tree, which he had planted after signing the Declaration of Independence, Ward said. The seeds were brought back from Philadelphia.

    http://news.yahoo.com/never-too-declaration-signers-being-honored-235955461.html

    Edited by: DixieDestroyer
     

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