Good Investment

Discussion in 'Happy Hour' started by waterbed, Sep 29, 2010.

  1. Don Wassall

    Don Wassall Administrator Staff Member

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    Precious metals have been relentlessly smashed the past week with no end in sight. Silver is down over 12% just today after getting hammered big time last week. Gold is down $124 today. Absolutely amazing. Precious metals were thought to be the one good investing sphere left; now there's only the stock market, which is in a bubble dominated by computers trading on algorithms and various smoke and mirrors manipulations controlled by the banksters and big trading firms. Everything going on is counterintuitive, mainly because all markets (and government statistics) are heavily manipulated.
     
  2. white is right

    white is right Hall of Famer

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    Yes the stock market "recovery" is largely an obvious con and manipulation of the market. Where is the growth in the "robust" US economy? The "recovery" is largely paper growth that shouldn't sustain itself and a double dip recession should insue. Europe for the most part is back into a recession and North America should follow. People are making money during this market but it won't be the Average Joe investor.....
     
  3. Kaptain

    Kaptain Master

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    Something big seems to be brewing. With a commodities crash, particularly precious metals, everyones got to be wondering what is really going on. At the very least it's got to make those in the stock market nervous. Could it be a coincidence that the most recent reports on all commodities have suddenly found stockpiles of supply? A couple of weeks ago the USDA suddenly finds stockpiles of corn. Oil supply is suddenly up. And now, precious metals selling off. Something bigger is looming and yet to be revealed.
     
  4. Freethinker

    Freethinker Hall of Famer

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    Agreed. This seems like a manipulation by the usual suspects with lots of paper to throw around to crash the market. They'll force out people with paper gold and silver investments or force them to make their margin calls. Basically the people with weak positions and then buy them back up on the cheap.

    I don't think this effects people invested in gold and silver bars or coins as much. At least not those people who "stack" for long term investment. If anything, they'll see it as a buying opportunity. But here's where it gets fishy. Go to kitco or apmex and try to buy coins. Mostly sold out or not shipping to the US (kitco). The one's that are in stock have higher premiums then normal. So if this gold bubble (precious metals really) is bursting, as I've seen the talking heads tell us, then why is physical at such a premium right now? Also, how can this be a bubble when such a low percent of the public owns gold or silver? Joe Six Pack owns neither and would still look at you crazy if you told him he should.

    I think Kaptain is right that something big is brewing in the financial world that we'll soon discover.
     
  5. DixieDestroyer

    DixieDestroyer Hall of Famer

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    I've long suspected the PTB will use a manufactured financial 'collapse' as the trigger for the (ensuing) chaos that will 'justify' martial law. This could be an initial step or a 'beta test' of sorts. Now may be a great opportunity to load up on gold and silver.

    http://blogs.wsj.com/marketbeat/201...4/15/gold-silver-slump-further-into-the-abyss
     
  6. Average American

    Average American Mentor

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    remember the presidential dollar coin series that was started a few years back (?), I read they were having trouble getting them circulated, so reduced the program to just limited releases (basically for collectors), for all the remaining presidents..
    anyways, they were essentially worthless in value,
    but the mint also released accompanying 1/2 oz. gold coins of each president's wife.. (anybody seen these?) some are kinda' cool, & for guys like me, will have an easier time occassionally buying gold by the half ounce..

    [​IMG]
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    [​IMG]
     
  7. Thrashen

    Thrashen Hall of Famer

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    I received my mortgage statement in the mail yesterday, which basically indicated that my loan “payoff amount” was a sum that I anticipate paying in full within the next twelve months (May of 2015). I’m about to turn 28, my wife is about to turn 29, and we’ve been married for nearly 6 years and have had our house (a split-level home on 9 acres) for about 4 years. Over those years, we’ve made endless improvements to the house, inside and out, but I was fortunately still able to put a substantial amount on the principal of the loan each month. Thankfully, due to partial scholarships and working full-time, I was able to pay for my college without taking a loan. We paid off her college debt shortly after getting married. We have 4 vehicles (2 cars, work truck, SUV), but all were purchased with cash and we’ve never had a car payment (if you read my posts in the “Automotive Section” thread, you know why, haha) and we have no other loans, debt, or bills aside from monthly TV/phone/internet/electric. My goal of being financially independent has certainly left us strapped for cash on many occasions and has required us to forgo many purchases for ourselves and young kids. We don’t “live large” in any way because it isn’t in our nature. We have very high-mileage vehicles (2 over 200,000), we have the cheapest cell phones, the cheapest TV package, we grow lots of food for ourselves/livestock in the summer, we burn firewood for heat, we don't spend much when we go out to eat, etc.

    The reason I’m posting this is because everyone I tell (friends, co-workers, neighbors, etc) about my aggressive payment schedule thinks I’m a complete fool. They site reasons such as:

    1) The principal money would “work harder for you” if placed into a high-yield CD, safe stocks, or a 401K retirement plan.

    2) Once your home is paid off, all of your money is “tied up” in real estate until you sell the home.

    3) Without a mortgage loan, you won’t get as much of a tax break on your mortgage interest deduction.

    4) What if you need a substantial amount of money for a “rainy day?”

    5) What if the real estate market goes south and you’ve paid off a house you can’t even sell to break even?

    6) With such a low mortgage interest rate, it’s better to save the money and earn interest while paying the full 30-year mortgage term.

    I know there are some highly intelligent and responsible posters here, so I guess I was just curious what your take is on the matter? Even if any or all of these arguments are correct, I could care less. All that really matters to me is that my wife/kids are taken care of if something ever happened to me and leaving them with no mortgage/debt would be a great start. Despite what people say, I plan to pay my place off in the next year and bank a nest egg for their college tuition and to possibly purchase more land to build my agricultural side business. Also, I don’t ever plan to take a loan again, which means that I can officially detach from the Jewish banking cartel, which is a great feeling.
     
    Last edited: May 28, 2014
  8. Don Wassall

    Don Wassall Administrator Staff Member

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    I think you've done the right thing by lowering and soon eliminating your debt. Debt bondage is how most Americans are slaves to the system whether they want to be or not.

    Your nine acres of land should always maintain good value. And there haven't really been any money making investments for most people for a number of years. CDs and savings accounts? A big loser given that they pay 1% and the inflation rate is at least 5% and probably more like 10%. The stock market has done well for several years, but mainly because that's where the bulk of the QE funny money is going as there are no other places to invest. The rich are putting their money into the stock market, and also into high-end investments like art, coins and land.

    All markets are heavily manipulated at this time. The stock market is manipulated upward to make it appear as though the U.S. economy is healthier than it is, and also to prop up the dollar as the key international battle currently taking place is the one to maintain the fiat buck as the global currency of trade and finance against a variety of forces seeking to replace it. If the dollar loses the special status it's had since the end of WWII, Washington instantly loses a lot of power to influence events through its now endless ability to "print" money out of thin air, not to mention the downward slide of the working and middle class will noticeably accelerate.

    Trying to make the dollar look stronger than it is, is why the price of gold and silver continues to be suppressed. But the West is running out of gold as the East is buying it hand over fist, and silver mining is down but silver has irreplaceable industrial uses that are only going to increase in the future.

    So gold and silver are important to have as insurance if nothing else, stay as debt-free as possible, and besides owning a home and land, stocks are still the best long-term investment even in a totally corrupt time such as now.
     
  9. Westside

    Westside Hall of Famer

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    Thrashen, I like what you have done. I am on my way to something similar. I will payoff my house in about 5 years. Then rent it out, buy another once its paid off in a nearby city. Rent out the 1st house for about 2500/3000 dollars a mouth. I have accrued 350K in my 401K account. I drive my 1st new car I ever bought in 1991. It has 420K miles on it. Currently in negotiations to buy a 2014 Audi S4 (a treat to myself, unreal car and performance). I am playing 3 dealers against each other. The car will cost around 56 K. I will pay it off in 4 or 5 years. I plan on working 7 more years. I will have a pension paying 80% of my base pay and hopefully my 401k will be 800K. Currently I am debt free except for the mortgage. When I retire I will be debt free, and have revenue streams from a rental, pension and 401K. Basically I live a comfortable life, but I live within my means.

    Thrashen, I know what an acre looks like. Your spread must be unbelievable!
     
  10. Westside

    Westside Hall of Famer

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    Don, within a year, I plan on purchasing a large safe. At that point i will consider purchasing a substantial quantity of physical gold and silver.
     
  11. Thrashen

    Thrashen Hall of Famer

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    I appreciate the advice and feedback, Don. Of course, I agree that all capital-related systems in the U.S. are, and have been, controlled by Zio-Capitalist Jews and rich whites for over 100 years. It’s fascinating and pathetic to witness such a massive quantity of upper, middle, and lower class whites undertake a 30-year mortgage (without making principal payments), home equity loans, student loans, car payments, boat payments, and absurd amounts of credit card debt that they’ll be paying for well into their 60’s. Hell, I even know a few guys with a monthly lawnmower payment!

    Daily life in the Judeo-Marxist West is truly one of decadence, precooked gratification, spiritual vacuity, and living-for-the-moment hedonism. I literally beg the whites I associate with to avoid these financial pitfalls, but the temptation to pamper one’s self and “impress” one’s peers with materialism is far too ingrained. A question for some of our older posters…when did a significant percentage of American whites begin to act so financially irresponsible? I assume that it all began in the late 1960’s/early 1970’s, the same foul chain of years that unleased so many other racial, sexual, political, and societal ills.

    Personally, I’ve never purchased stocks, bonds, or had my money in a CD or IRA in my life…but that’s mostly due to the fact that I’ve never had more than a few thousand dollars to my name since putting a large down payment on my house back when it was first purchased. Once my house is paid off next year, I might explore some very safe investment options such as gold and silver after I bank some money.

    Wow, sounds like you’ve set yourself up very nicely for the future, which I imagine is quite difficult to do in a high cost of living area like LA. That’s really rare that your car has so many miles and I congratulate you for keeping it going for so long. My advice is that if you do buy yourself that new car, maybe you could keep the old one that’s given you so much over the past 20+ years for use in less desirable driving areas. I assume you’ve had minimum car insurance coverage on it for many years, so it shouldn’t cost you too much to keep it, right? My Ford Focus is closing in on 270,000 miles and I wouldn’t part with it for any reason. And yes, my place is coming along nicely. It’s a good mixture of field and woods and is very private. I just finished building my second fish pond on the property two weeks ago (about 1/4[SUP]th[/SUP] of an acre in size), which my wife/daughters love because it has a slender portion in the middle with a decorative bridge spanning the water. I don’t have much free time, but I’ll be fishing alot this summer to fill it with native PA species (sunfish, bass, carp, catfish, minnows, crappie, perch, etc).
     
    Last edited: May 29, 2014
  12. Carolina Speed

    Carolina Speed Master

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    This is a great topic and post, Thrashen, and good sound advice for everyone here, especially the younger guys/gals!

    "The rich ruleth over the poor, and the BORROWER is a SLAVE to the lender!" Proverbs: 22:7. The Bible says a lot about money and Jesus spoke more about money than heaven or hell!

    Unfortunately, I learned this lesson the hard way! To make a long story short, I grew up not having a lot as a child in the way of money. When I got of college and then the Marine Corps, I started out in the factory from the ground up and then advanced into sales in a the company I was working for. Sales in the early 90's was booming and I started to make good money for me. I bought the big house, nice car, credit cards, etc. Accumulated a lot of debt, however, after 911 the bottom fell out. Fortunately, I didn't lose everything, but things were really tough for our family for years. Had I managed my money properly, like bought a smaller home, had less of a car, no credit cards. I would be debt free today and would in better shape financially.

    The financial pattern that Don, Thrashen and Westside have posted is the intelligent way to go. As financial expert Dave Ramsey says, " Live like no one else today, so you can live like no one else later."

    Thrashen, your friends, neighbors, etc. are the fools! There are too many points to mention, but briefly..

    Your friends are banking on having a job for 30 years to pay the 30 year mortgage, no one is guaranteed a job beyond today!

    The tax break theory is a myth. Take your monthly house payment and multiply by 12 months and tell me your going to get that kind of tax break at the end of the year, that's BS!

    What if the real estate business goes south and in your in the real estate business and have a 30 year mortgage? If your home is paid for, at least you'll have a place to live.

    You do need to have substantial amount of savings, say, at the minimum 6 months of your salary or what it takes to pay the bills. Have this saved before you even think about buying a house in case you do lose your job, you can still pay the bills while looking for another job.

    There are countless other things to be said about this subject. I wish I had done what Thrashen and Westside are doing at their age. However, I can report, I never lost my house, thank God, and I am almost debt free. I basically only have my mortgage to pay and about 10 years from paying it off. We have 3 cars and they're all paid for. I have over 200,000 miles on a Chevy Malibu and over 150,000 miles on a Ford Expedition!

    Great job Thrashen and Westside. I applaud you. Everyone here should heed their advice!
     
    Last edited: May 29, 2014
  13. Westside

    Westside Hall of Famer

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    Wow, sounds like you’ve set yourself up very nicely for the future, which I imagine is quite difficult to do in a high cost of living area like LA. That’s really rare that your car has so many miles and I congratulate you for keeping it going for so long. My advice is that if you do buy yourself that new car, maybe you could keep the old one that’s given you so much over the past 20+ years for use in less desirable driving areas. I assume you’ve had minimum car insurance coverage on it for many years, so it shouldn’t cost you too much to keep it, right? My Ford Focus is closing in on 270,000 miles and I wouldn’t part with it for any reason. And yes, my place is coming along nicely. It’s a good mixture of field and woods and is very private. I just finished building my second fish pond on the property two weeks ago (about 1/4[SUP]th[/SUP] of an acre in size), which my wife/daughters love because it has a slender portion in the middle with a decorative bridge spanning the water. I don’t have much free time, but I’ll be fishing alot this summer to fill it with native PA species (sunfish, bass, carp, catfish, minnows, crappie, perch, etc).[/QUOTE]


    Thrashen, the car I speak of is a 1991 Honda Accord. I bought it new once I got home from Desert Storm. It has been painted twice. Once I get the S4 I will paint it again. It has a bunch of bolt on mods. It still hums and gets 30 mpg. I have changed the clutch 3 times, and went through 3 radiators and bunch of electrical components. But it still has the SAME engine. Like you, I could never part with the Accord, it has become part of me and served me so well. Yes, it has the basic insurance. But people still come up to me at the gas stations, and say "nice ride." LOL

    Was at a Audi Dealer today. This one dealership would only go 2K under invoice and not budge on extended warranty. Tomorrow I will go to another one to get the 2K below invoice and get the extended warranty or get the warranty half off. When buying a new car, the term "Jewing them down" is all me. LOL
     
    Last edited: May 29, 2014
  14. jaxvid

    jaxvid Hall of Famer

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    Interesting subject.

    Thrashens questions:

    "The reason I’m posting this is because everyone I tell (friends, co-workers, neighbors, etc) about my aggressive payment schedule thinks I’m a complete fool. They site reasons such as:

    1) The principal money would “work harder for you†if placed into a high-yield CD, safe stocks, or a 401K retirement plan.

    2) Once your home is paid off, all of your money is “tied up†in real estate until you sell the home.

    3) Without a mortgage loan, you won’t get as much of a tax break on your mortgage interest deduction.

    4) What if you need a substantial amount of money for a “rainy day?â€

    5) What if the real estate market goes south and you’ve paid off a house you can’t even sell to break even?

    6) With such a low mortgage interest rate, it’s better to save the money and earn interest while paying the full 30-year mortgage term."

    As Don mentioned the old ideas about the advantages of home ownership have changed. Like everything else in this dying empire the old values are no longer applicable. Paying off a loan early is always a good strategy. Interest paid on bank accounts and CD's are hardly worth it. And some of the items mentioned above contradict each other.

    For example CD's are no good for "rainy day" money as the tax penalties for early withdrawal are prohibitive. Also the idea of the market going south on a house you could not sell to break even is a hundred times better then having that same house, owing money on it and it not being worth what you still owe. Then you are underwater, if it's paid off then you are looking at still making money on a sale. A house being devalued is never a good thing but it's much worse when you owe more then it's worth.

    Mortgage interest deduction is good, while it lasts, who knows where the multikult state will look for money next? But the deduction is not as good as not having to pay it in the first place.

    And if your place is paid off and you need money you can get a second mortgage or take out a home equity loan and get all the money you need. Home ownership is still a marker of a good credit risk so any borrowing is going to be better for someone that owns a home.

    I personally think that the next big push will be to squeeze money out of home owners and 401K's because that is where white people have their money and since no one represents white people it will be the easiest target. Perhaps that would awaken white people but I've given up on that idea. They will be marching white people into ovens and the silent majority will still be silent, the liberals will still say white people deserve it, and the Republicans will run on a platform of more gradual marching into ovens.
     
  15. BeyondFedUp

    BeyondFedUp Master

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    Jaxvid,
    Your insight and post seem right on target. Unfortunately, so does your sig. I don't frequent the site much anymore, and then when I do, I just end up venting. I don't know why I bothered with my recent postings now that I think about it. You guys are good, like-minded folks, IMHO. I don't have a vast array of places to go where people have any brains left fully functional...
     
  16. Don Wassall

    Don Wassall Administrator Staff Member

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    Silver has really perked up recently after a nine year slumber. It's been going up about a dollar a day of late and is over $28 an ounce as I write this. And gold is now at an all-time record price of over $2,000 an ounce but silver is still well below its record of $50, set in 1980 and matched in 2011.

    The price rise is mostly because of economic uncertainty, but silver might keep going higher and higher for a while as the depression caused by governments and media in response to the Chinese Flu won't be going away any time soon. And silver has important industrial uses, especially if things keep moving in a "green" direction. But then again, it has been nine long years since the last time silver was on the move and the price of precious metals has been suppressed and manipulated for decades by the Comex. It will take tremendous demand for that manipulation to be broken.
     
    Last edited: Aug 6, 2020
  17. white is right

    white is right Hall of Famer

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    Silver has been on real tear lately and could hit a historical high in the next few months. I will admit that I saw it's undervalue but when it was languishing below 20 US an ounce a few months back I felt if it wasn't going up then, when will it ever go up.

    As for gold it's been pointing up for a good year now but the price point to get into gold beyond over marked up gram level purchases is very steep for the casual investor. I myself am kicking myself over silver as a 100 ounce bar which was about 1500 US just a shade over a half year is now priced at around 3K US now from precious metal brokers.

    PS, if anybody is looking to sell off silver coins/bars or gold coins or bars, you should look to sell to precious metal dealers in major financial centers of big cities as the commission that cheque cashing services charge or pawn shops charge is nearly double that of metal dealers.

    I also think that Platinum is probably going on bull run at some point in the near future.
     
  18. Freethinker

    Freethinker Hall of Famer

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    Great post. Really summarized what I came to this thread to say myself.

    It’s been a long 9 years staying the course as a silver “stacker” but I’m glad I didn’t sell off a single ounce until recently. I have to admit, in the last 3 or so years, I lost interest in precious metals and starting investing my additional cash into cryptocurrencies. While I wish I had bought more silver rounds while the price lingered in the $15 an ounce range, I’m not mad as bitcoin is steadily marching towards $12,000!

    Would anyone be surprised if Bitcoin also broke its all time high of $19,900, as well as silver, later in 20 or early in 21? After all the US federal reserve is determined to print the dollar into ruin and other fiat currencies are equally unstable. Globally, people everywhere are looking for safer alternatives for preservation of wealth.
     
    Last edited: Aug 6, 2020
  19. werewolf

    werewolf Hall of Famer

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  20. Amren.com

    Amren.com Mentor

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    The price of silver (and gold) is and has been artificially suppressed since the sixties. There's a bunch of reasons why silver could skyrocket and even then it may take a long time for that to happen. If you're going to buy, buy when it's cheap (it seems to get smashed down on a regular basis), buy physical that you store at home and make sure your finances are such that you won't need to sell it on short notice to pay for something else. Your top priorities should be paying off credit cards in full every month and then having six months of living expenses saved in a bank account.

    http://www.silverbearcafe.com/private/08.20/tinysilver.html
     
  21. Amren.com

    Amren.com Mentor

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    sp_en_6.gif
    And sure enough silver and gold are getting smashed down right now although you probably won't be able to buy physical at a nice price.
     
  22. Freethinker

    Freethinker Hall of Famer

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    Hard to believe that 8 short months ago I was excited about the prospects of BTC hitting 12K. Earlier this morning, BTC set a new all time high and broke 60K! A happy day for any of you guys holding (or HODLing as the meme goes).

    I think BTC is the best true indicator for inflation. It has basically supplanted the precious metals market in that regard. The explosion of the BTC price in dollars, is a reflection of all of the central banks printing fiat like madmen over the last year. They all seem hellbent to destroy their nation’s currencies and BTC might just be the instrument to help push them off the cliff.
     
  23. DWF Upside

    DWF Upside Mentor

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    Would have been great to jump into this Ponzi-Scheme early on. The government would have regulated this already if it were long term, maybe they create their one and only afterwards?

    Options trading is my new obsession, it would be great if this place could talk about stocks more often ( beyond tired of rooting for teams of thugs, while being shamed in the commercials).

    My thoughts ( could be 100% wrong) are that Super-Computing, control of all media, unfair access to trades etc., information in govt decisions, etc. has given the (((Big Whales))) a position in which they cannot lose.

    In the short term I think BitCoin goes up to about $75K. They’ll take the soon to be stimulus money into it. Data mining stocks will skyrocket far more profitable than bitcoin. The big money Boomers are starting to come around on this as well.

    When everyone “buys in” and were close thats when it starts to resemble the readings of an EKG machine after a sharp decline. It will be the greatest scam the world has ever seen. The trading platforms will probably freeze during crucial drop in the middle of the night.

    You got any under the radar stocks going up or down in the next couple weeks? If it weren't for the obvious threat of inflation I’d say we are looking at a 20% drop again, but its too complicated for me. How long until GME crashes or does it?
     
    Last edited: Mar 13, 2021

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