APBA Replay

Discussion in 'Baseball' started by angelus, Sep 14, 2020.

  1. angelus

    angelus Newbie

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    I hope this is the right place (though I’m sure there’s not a right place for this post)

    I am replaying 1994 season through my APBA game but I am going to reassign all the players to different teams.

    Not being a creative person, I am looking for team names that the SJWs would hate. I’ll probably name one team the Redskins in honor of the many schools and professional teams that have been purged. Maybe one team will be the Fighting Sioux. Pekin, IL used to be the Pekin Chinks. That could be a candidate.

    Any suggestions would be welcomed.

    And I apologize if I’ve posted this in the wrong section.
     
  2. Bucky

    Bucky Hall of Famer

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    Something to honor St. Rittenhouse
     
  3. angelus

    angelus Newbie

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    I like that!
     
  4. Bucky

    Bucky Hall of Famer

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    :beer-toast1:
     
  5. angelus

    angelus Newbie

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  6. Shadowlight

    Shadowlight Master

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    Cripes APBA? Brings back memories. I used to see their ads in comic books along with Strat-O-Matic. I bought Strat-O-Matic when it was a board game. I was amazed at how accurate it was but I figured the trick was to find a way to roll the dice in a favorable way. I sort of half cheated. Ha. If certain players I liked got off to slow starts I would just start the season all over again. Truly laughable.

    The only thing they didn't factor in was number of at bats. A player could have great stats in limited at bats but they never factored in the natural downward trajectory of such a player if he had more at bats. Same goes with pitchers.

    I never got around to getting APBA but was intrigued. I vaguely recall ads would have Strat and APBA dissing on each other. Like being more realistic than so and so.

    Man I miss the joy of my youth. Maybe a terrible natural function of age but everything is tinged with grey now.
     
  7. angelus

    angelus Newbie

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    I still love to play it. Working from home now makes it much easier.

    My project may end up being an all white replay, which is why I am redrafting teams. I don’t want players like Bonds in my replay.

    I also used to play Statis Pro Basketball. I am currently doing a replay of the 1985-1986 Boston Celtics great season.
     
  8. shamrock

    shamrock Newbie

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    Loved APBA and still sometimes play. Single best player's game: Mickey Mantle once went 5 for 5, two doubles, two HRs, and a single; drove in 9 runs; also stole 3 bases out of 3 attempts.

    If you like sports board games, one of the best is a horse racing game called "Win, Place, and Show." Closest thing to real horse racing I've ever seen and, like APBA, has horse cards which represent quite accurately each horse's speed, stamina, and running style. Includes horses like Secretariat, Seabiscuit, Whirlaway, American Pharoah, and Man o' War.
     
  9. werewolf

    werewolf Hall of Famer

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    Oh man I spent so many hours playing APBA when i was a kid! I got so good i cld finish a game in about 20 minutes!
     
    Last edited: Apr 3, 2021
  10. werewolf

    werewolf Hall of Famer

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    Yeah, well said. It seemed so important and exciting when the dice rolled an 11 or 66, or 23 came up with men on 1st and 3rd or whatever it was, and caused a rare APBA "rainout".
     
  11. werewolf

    werewolf Hall of Famer

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    I read a book years ago about a man who becomes so obsessed with his table baseball game that it comes to dominate his whole life, The Universal Baseball Associationby by Robert Coover.
     
  12. shamrock

    shamrock Newbie

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    Really liked your previous comment, Wolf Man: "Everything is tinged with gray now." That struck me as a spot-on definition of my life at 71. I'm still in reasonably good health (for this specific moment, that is) but am always waiting for the other shoe to drop. Spend more time in doctor's offices than I ever dreamed I would, but so do most people my age. Mostly, though, I'm waiting for the BIG shoe to drop or should I say, the HAMMER. Can't help thinking about it. Got maybe a dozen years left, if I'm very lucky, and these years getting more and more shadowy, flying like speedy phantoms through the air.

    I think back on my youthful summers. Unlike today's boys, we kids were always outside. In the morning we'd play baseball on a vacant lot nearby. As our Alabama afternoon temps climbed, we'd come inside and play APBA and trade baseball cards. If no one was around I'd play APBA alone, recording stats in a notebook. Then, as the sun reached the horizon, I'd go back outside and ride my bike in the cooled-down streets as twilight began to fall. I'd ride with a couple of friends under the street lights and then go to a friend's yard where ghost stories were being told within a tight circle of three or four, all speaking in spooky whispers, soon jumping at the sound of the wind in the trees above us. When fall came, we'd play tackle football after school in the large yard of a neighbor nearby, with often 10 or 12 kids showing up on those cool autumnal afternoons. When Halloween night blew in, a close friend and I would eagerly hit the pavement. We were always the last ones back from trick or treating, roaming all over our neighborhood and then into the next, begging candy and making an adventure out of it until adults who opened doors would finally yell us out and tell us it was time to go home. Then we'd trek back through the dark, lonely streets, moonlit shadows falling across the lawns, last of the porch lights snapping out. Hard to believe life was ever that good!

    I read The Universal Baseball Association, a brilliantly imaginative book, when I was in my 30s and couldn't help deeply missing the great APBA games of my childhood. Coover had obviously played either Strat or APBA at one time (book first published in 1968), or he really had created the kind of dice rules exhibited in the book. The opening chapters really thrilled me, taking me right back to my folks' kitchen table at 12 and 13 years old, but then the story deteriorated and became tragic, something I never associated with my happy APBA childhood. I remember how magic APBA had felt to me! I'd roll the dice and, quick-as-the-crack-of-the-bat, results would flash before my eyes. "Musial doubles off the wall!" or "Koufax breezed him!"

    Wish I could go back and do it all again: Buy a wax pack of baseball cards and feverishly tear them open hoping to find a Stan Musial, Al Kaline, Mickey Mantle, or Warren Spahn, whereupon I'd stick the card in my Dad's face yelling, "Dad, look who I got!" Of course he'd yell, "Get that thing out of my face!" but later he'd come around quietly and say, "Let's see what you've got there," and then comment, "This guy's good, keep this one," etc. Greatly miss playing backyard football at 11-and-12-years old; racing a friend on my bike; telling chilling ghost stories on a darkened porch (we told some good ones, some based on local Mobile history); watching the late-night monster movies - ("Frankenstein"; Bela Lugosi's "Dracula"; "Cry of the Wolf," etc.); and playing burnout with my friends (OW! I can still remember catching a couple of young fireballers).

    I can tell you feel much the same about those bygone days, Werewolf. I suppose most of us do. I keep a small notebook into which I enter quotations or written lines that I find particularly striking or compelling, and I've just entered your line about everything being tinged with gray, word-for-word, just as you put it. Characterizes all too well where I am now, though my youthful memories are tinged in pure gold, as you see. I'd enjoy hearing such reminiscences if you have any to add. Always nice to hear how others experienced their own personal, magical childhoods.
     
    Last edited: Apr 13, 2021
  13. werewolf

    werewolf Hall of Famer

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    Beautiful post, Shamrock. Which post of mine r u referring to? I don't c any of mine above worthy of those accolades. Perhaps i deleted it. I don't know. I don't remember. Don't ask me. Idindonuffin.

    You cld hv grown up in my neighborhood, esp w a name like "Shamrock", Mine was a predominantly Irish neighborhood, tho mixed with other random riff raffs, like moi. I was just talking with a kid i grew up w in the old hood who got into APBA like me , butI discovered it! I spent enough hours on it i cld hv earned 10 PHd's if i did schoolwork instead. He eventually did do his schoolwork and did get a PHd, or something or other in electrical engineering, and ran the electric companies in a vast swath of what was then still the USA, and hung out with presidents and suchlike riff raff. APBA bum makes good! I think APBA helped me with my ____ schtick, tho my main jobs were always far from that, and i wldnt hang out w presidents even if they asked me to (they haven't), no recent ones anyway - and what wld i even talk to "president" Biden about anyway, adult diapers?

    Like you, we were always outdoors, in the woods, on the bike, playing all our city AND country sports and games - we had both!

    Facebook (Suckerburger's private thing - a guy i worked with - my friend and old partner on the job - said his kid went to school with Suckerburger. Unfortunately my friend's kid went bad and became a lawyer - Facebook has a group for grown men who still play APBA. I look at it every now and then, but APBA has lost its magic for me...that "grey tinge". When i was little there was a song that made me so sad, Toyland toyland little girl and boyland; Once that u leave it u can never return again..."
     
    Last edited: Apr 28, 2021
  14. shamrock

    shamrock Newbie

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    Your last sentence is a sad one, not ever being able to go back and all. But "Suckerburger"? Now that's classic. Also a great line about your "friend's kid went bad and became a lawyer." Thanks for the laughs!
     
  15. werewolf

    werewolf Hall of Famer

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    I thought so, because yeah i loved my toyland, all the fantasies i built up and imagined and pretended, up to and including APBA - and dammit the song was true!

     

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