UEFA EURO 2012

Discussion in 'Soccer' started by Porthos, May 8, 2012.

  1. Liverlips

    Liverlips Hall of Famer

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    Good news - it seems France will never learn.
     
  2. Europe

    Europe Mentor

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    6 out of the 18 players were black on England's u19 including 4 out of 5 strikers. It looks like they had 4 black starters judging by a few names I couldn't get a picture of. If you're English, white and a striker you are being discriminated against.

    One of the black players looks mostly white but he is part Bajan, which I had never heard of.

    [​IMG]

    Hallam Hope looks mostly white. He's here with his dad.


    These stupid coaches are so obsessed with these black attacking players.

    Greece still had all Greek names.
     
  3. Europe

    Europe Mentor

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    Frederic38

    I saw some highlights of the French u19 and was horrified. Senegal might be whiter.
     
  4. frederic38

    frederic38 Hall of Famer

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    it's always like that with our youth squads
    in england they still produce a lot of local players, maybe the english play the game more than the french

    that's actually the whitest french youth squad i recall, usually there are 2 white players max

    a few weeks ago i saw a link on facebook to watch a match involving youth squads for free, i think it was germany vs france
    i watched only 2 minutes, then read the comments on that link:
    a lot were mentionning a black german which looked to be 5 years older than the other players
    and the rest mentionned the high number of blacks
    it's more shocking now that we have a national team with more than 50% of the players that are whites
    most of these players won't go anywhere in soccer anyways
     
  5. Rebajlo

    Rebajlo Mentor

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    Frederic -

    Thanks for the compliment, mate. Your own contributions to the forum are highly impressive and the enthusiasm that You display reminds me of how I once felt about football myself.

    From Your past posts, one can extrapolate that You are 28 or 29 years old. As things go, I began to lose "serious" interest in the sport when I was about 27. To be perfectly honest, with the vast numbers of blacks and other "undesirables" littering football for the past decade and a half, if I was Your age I probably would have forsaken the game in my early teens. For that matter, if I grew up in France I would have despised football altogether and avoided it like a slapper with the jack...

    In my opinion, the soccer sub-forum is moving along very nicely as we have several knowledgeable regulars providing accurate news and information from various angles. I'd like to take the opportunity to thank everyone for their input and for making this a truly enjoyable forum (the same, of course, holds for our non-soccer fellows who do a sterling job in their "own" sections).

    For all of the lurkers out there, I encourage You to register and say Your bit. After all, where else can You openly discuss the "real" issues without being labelled a "racist", a nutcase, a caveman, or a "fascist" - followed by a self-righteously "argument ending" ban from an "administrator" or "moderator" who is either a shoestring-limbed, pop-eyed, rabidly anti-White, kosher-cut Yid or some self-hating, basement-dwelling, Negro-revering "caucasian" rap fan and interracial porn addict clad only in sweat and fart-stained undies, half-rotten socks and an inferiority complex inversely proportional to the size of his vole-esque genitalia? :icon_wink:
     
  6. Rebajlo

    Rebajlo Mentor

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    Matra2, Porthos -

    Thanks for posting all of those additional instances of biased refereeing at the World Cup. I have a habit of relating events in detail, so I tend to concentrate on one or two games at a time - even then, my posts blow out in length...

    Truth be told, when I write about these things I become so angry that I often just have to stop and go off to do something else in order to calm mself down. When it comes to football, my unhealthily paradoxical mixture of chivalric idealism and a bleakly cynical view of humanity is a recipe for constant disillusionment and suspicion, which have cast a long shadow athwart my enjoyment of the game since childhood.

    Of the 19 World Cups played so far, 14 have been won by the so-called "Big Four" of Brazil, Italy, Germany, and Argentina. Between them, the "Big Four" have also been losing finalists on 10 occassions.

    Brazil - winners: 5; runners up: 2

    Italy - winners: 4; runners up 2

    Germany - winners: 3; runners up: 4

    Argentina - winners: 2; runners up: 2

    These statsitics would look far different if fair refereeing had been the norm. For example, if Italy's all-round cheating had been punished in 1934, Czechoslovakia would have won the title. If West Germany hadn't enjoyed those favours in the 1954 final, Hungary would have won, et cetera.

    One decision in particular was pivotal both in terms of the destination of the World Cup trophy and in shaping the reputation of arguably the world's greatest ever player. This, of course, was Diego Maradona's "Hand of God".

    Can You imagine if the match officials (Tunisian referee, Costa Rican and Bulgarian linesmen) had disallowed the "Hand of God goal" - and red-carded Maradona for brazen deceit?

    Firstly, Argentina would undoubtedly have lost the quarterfinal against England and would therefore only have "won" a single World Cup (their nefariously contrived home soil "triumph" of 1978).

    Secondly, and even more significantly, Maradona's legendary reputation as a footballing genius would never have attained two of its key underpinning components, as he:

    (a) would not have scored the "Goal of the Century" three minutes later, and

    (b) would not have won a World Cup almost single-handedly

    Without a World Cup trophy to his name and constantly-repeated footage of the second goal of the match, Maradona wouldn't be billed as the greatest footballer of all time, a title which would be exclusively reserved for that black fraud Pele. Instead, the Argentine would largely be remembered as a failure on the international stage and a player who was sent off in successive World Cups.

    Maradona had been red-carded for putting his studs into Brazilian substitute Batista's bollocks in the 85th minute of a second round match in 1982. However, what everyone generally fails to mention is that Batista had raised a foot into the face of Argentina's Juan Barbas a couple of seconds earlier, so Maradona was actually getting in a bit of retaliation. But as Batista is Brazilian - and according to the media Brazilians are angelic players who can do no wrong - this little detail is conveniently omitted...

    As we are posting all of these examples in the Euro 2012 thread, I'll raise a dodgy episode from the qualification tournament for the 1984 European Championship. As it occurred in the preliminaries, this match is not as well known as our aforementioned World Cup games but it's still remembered with distaste in the Netherlands, the nation whose team was deprived of a berth in the finals because of what transpired.

    The Netherlands had finished all of their matches in Group 7 and sat on top of the table with 13 points, two clear of Spain. Back then, a win was worth two points and the Spaniards had one game remaining, which was at home against last-placed Malta. The Dutch position seemed secure enough as they had scored 22 goals and conceded 6, giving them a goal difference of 16. The Spaniards, on the other hand, had scored 12 goals and conceded 7, which equated to a goal difference of 5. In othet words, the only way Spain could surpass the Netehrlands was if they managed to beat Malta by a staggering 11 goals, which would tie up the goal differences but allow the Iberians to advance on the basis of goals scored.

    The Maltese had been on the receiving end of a few hidings in the earlier rounds, having lost six of their seven matches, copping 25 goals in the process. Nonetheless, their heaviest losses had been 8-0 away to the Republic of Ireland, plus 5-0 and 6-0 at the hands of the Dutch. Interestingly enough, Malta had only narrowly lost 2-3 at home to Spain.

    In the final match, having missed a second minute penalty Spain scored after fifteen minutes but the Maltese equalised before falling behind 3-1. There was no further scoring in the first half, so in order to qualify Spain now had to get an additional nine goals without reply in the next 45 minutes.

    Sounds improbable? Well, not only did Spain score exactly nine more goals, they did so in 39 minutes, the final goal falling in the 84th minute! The 12-1 scoreline levelled the Spanish and Dutch goal differences at 16, with the Spaniards progressing by virtue of having scored 24 goals to the Netherlands' 22.

    Despite the "questionable" nature of Spain's qualification, the kid who would grow up to become Rebajlo was still glad that the Netherlands would not appear in the finals as they were already using non-Whites Ruud Gullit, Frank Rijkaard and Sonny Silooy.

    Matra2 -

    On the subject of the Euro 1984 qualifiers, I'm sure that You remember Northern Ireland's campaign, which saw the Ulstermen miss out on goal difference after finishing level on points with West Germany. Despite beating the Germans both home and away, Northern Ireland were undone by their away games against the two worst teams in the group: a draw with Albania (who lost six of their eight matches) and a bloody well 1-0 loss to Turkey.

    What made things worse were the circumstances under which the West Germans "won" 2-1 against Albania in Tirana. Have a look at this clip of the goals from that match:

    ALBANIA 1 WEST GERMANY 2 - 1983, European Championship qualifier:

    [video=youtube;n0qcc9IYUI0]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n0qcc9IYUI0[/video]

    If You want a prime example of German "pragmatism", look no further than their second goal. This was a penalty scored by that stuck-up prick Karl-Heinz Rummenigge following a "foul" on Stephan Engels, who deliberately barged into the defender then promptly went down in the area himself. The Albanians' goal also came from a penalty, but this one was legitimate, as - in a typically "clean" piece of play - Gerd Strack clearly used his arm to control the ball...

    Porthos -

    Until the end of the 1980s, any bias against eastern European teams was almost purely "political". From the final decade of the last century - the dawn of the age of soccer pay TV - it was replaced by the viewer / consumer based "financial" angle, particularly in club football. The "big clubs" were aggressively marketed as global brands, so the chinks, Japs, curries, and camel ball munchers naturally became accustomed to watching (and therefore funding) the "most successful" English, Spanish, Italian and German clubs. These non-European masses (in addition to the "trendy" European football-as-pop-entertainment fans) have no interest in what are termed "small" and "obscure" clubs. Imagine if the Champions League final was contested between, let's say, Hajduk Split and Lech Poznan. What would the worldwide viewing numbers be compared to a Barcelona - Manchester United decider?
     
    Last edited: Jul 20, 2012
  7. frederic38

    frederic38 Hall of Famer

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    i'm a little bit younger than that
    let's say that i was 10-11 years old during the 1998 world cup :wink:

    i was always frustrated because football (or soccer for the americans) was my favourite sport but i couldn't play it because it's for arabs and italian inmigrants here
    that's why i watch it a lot and have always been very passionated about it

    my father kept telling me that football was not for us, but it was frustrating, we (europeans) invented football, like most sports, and we always did sports a lot, from the ancient times to the middle ages, so why should we stop now?

    my grandfather gave me a book from 1930 where the writer says that the european elite gave up what they thought to be "primitive" or "violent" sports, much like now where they think that football is for the poor
    the ancient greek, especially the richest ones, did very hard sports like wrestling, because it was a way for them to be prepared to dominate the world
    giving up on sports is one of the reasons why we are now in the process of disapearing as a race, i believe

    i always felt like this section had potential, since there is a lot going on in football from a racial point of view
    i came here and tried to post a lot to raise interest from other people
    like i said i'm proud of some things, like the thread about benzema, it's the only place in the world where you have proof that benzema plays in real madrid because of his race, and that's really a shock for most french
    i hope a lot of people will read it
     
  8. Rebajlo

    Rebajlo Mentor

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    Frederic -

    So much for my "extrapolation", eh? :noidea: I must have got my wires crossed at some point...

    'Tis unfortunate that Your father said that "football was not for us" - there we have the "system" in action.

    As a kid, it always made me uncomfortable to see such a high proportion of "French" national team players of Italian and Spanish extraction (in addition to being coached by Michel Hidalgo). The Australian television "analysts" regularly delighted in drawing attention to Platini's "Italian background". Mind You, seeing blacks like Tresor, Tigana, Janvion and Couriol made me far more uncomfortable... :icon_wink:

    We are witnessing the same template being applied here in the NRL (National Rugby League) - Pacific Islanders, Maoris, and abos fill the roles of Negroes and Arabs. Have a look at the following links to a couple of NRL clubs' squad pages:

    CANTERBURY-BANKSTOWN BULLDOGS:

    http://www.bulldogs.com.au/playerprofiles

    MELBOURNE STORM:

    http://www.melbournestorm.com.au/playerprofiles

    SOUTH SYDNEY RABBITOHS:

    http://www.rabbitohs.com.au/playerprofiles

    If You think that the Premiership squads are loaded with coconuts, click on the "Toyota Cup" tabs to reveal the squads for the National Youth Competition. Just imagine what the NRL will look lile in a few years time...
     
  9. frederic38

    frederic38 Hall of Famer

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    it seems to be easier to put big black guys in rugby than in soccer
    the day when they will really try to make rugby look darker it will be easier than for soccer
    that's why i don't like when in france they say "just watch rugby instead of soccer, rugby is a lot whiter"
    they already tried to darken rugby and managed to do it but not as much as in soccer: http://www.castefootball.us/forums/...is-racist-according-to-french-arab-club-owner

    in the club that my family suported (bourgoin, CSBJ) there were some pacific islanders too, it was annoying
     
  10. Matra2

    Matra2 Master

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    Thanks for that, I was actually unaware of it. At the time I was living in Canada where we didn't even get the final between France and Spain never mind any qualifying. I can't say I've ever heard any Norn Iron fans bringing it up, but then 1984 is a long time ago, and many NI supporters have memory issues due to decades of alcohol abuse.:crazy:

    The bit about getting bad results against the weak teams is all too familiar. In qualifying for Euro 2008 NI beat Spain - the eventual champions - and looked like surprise qualifiers from the group...until they went and lost to Iceland (population 220,000) and Latvia (an ice hockey and basketball country) thanks to an own goal. I've heard it referred to as Scotland-itis: Performing well against the top teams in the world only to blow it by losing to bottom of the barrel rubbish teams.

    Incidentally, I just heard today that our our best player, Kyle Lafferty*, moved to FC Sion in the Swiss league. (Lafferty played for Glasgow Rangers - the less said, the better). Off the top of my head I can't think of any NI internationals playing on the continent other than Gerry Armstrong, who got to play in Spain because he scored the goal that put the Spanish out of their own World cup in 1982. Based on what I've seen of Swiss football Sion are probably quite diverse. Let's hope he gets playing on a regular basis.

    * Rebaljo, being of Polish background, will remember Lafferty for this:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dfTwmrD4Ews

    Of course, the most famous event of the Poland -NIreland qualifying ties for Euro 2008 happened at Windsor Park and was all about the own goal scored against Artur Boruc:

    [video=youtube;s0ly9hC1kO8]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s0ly9hC1kO8[/video]
     
    Last edited: Jul 30, 2012
  11. Rebajlo

    Rebajlo Mentor

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    Matra2 -

    Striker James Quinn (who was born in Coventry to parents from Belfast) was with Dutch club Willem II Tilburg for a couple of seasons prior to signing for Peterborough United via Sheffield Wednesday back in 2005. Now, that's a bit of trivia I wouldn't have been aware of if I wasn't a Posh fan... :icon_wink:

    Sammy McIlroy played a handful of games in Sweden for Orgryte after he left Manchester City, but as that brief adventure occurred so late in his career it doesn't really count...


    How could I possibly forget that... :blush: :doh:
     
  12. Rebajlo

    Rebajlo Mentor

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    Frederic -

    The squad pages I posted were of rugby league teams, not union teams but the situation in the latter code is quite similar, with Maoris and Pacific Islanders having a longer history of participation.

    Here are a couple of Australian Super Rugby teams' squad pages:

    NSW WARATAHS:

    http://www.waratahs.com.au/Waratahs/Team/SuperRugbySquad.aspx

    QUEENSLAND REDS:

    http://www.redsrugby.com.au/Reds.aspx

    As You can see, coconuts galore. Sickening...
     
  13. frederic38

    frederic38 Hall of Famer

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    interesting article by arsene wenger: http://uk.eurosport.yahoo.com/blogs/arsene-wenger/spain-lost-sparkle-082831822--sow.html

    during these euro champs, i had 2 complains about the spanish team:
    1-their out of shape defence (a strong defense was the base of the team that won the 2010 world cup, puyol and pique when at their best level were incredible, but puyol was not there in 2012, replaced by the impulsive sergio ramos, who's not a real central defender, and pique was out of shape)
    2-the lack of penetration when they had the ball, with no real strikers, possession for possession

    in the final match they totally crushed italy and all this was forgotten

    but i think that i understand now why they played this way: maybe they knew that their defence was vulnerable, so as arsene wenger said they " don't want to give the ball up because they don't want to give you a chance to score. That's the impression you get from Euro 2012"

    by the way the title of the article is misleading, spain is wenger's favourite team and he said that they were going to win the final
    the title of the same article written in french (because wenger writes in french and english) was "spain are going to win the final" ( http://www.eurosport.fr/arsene-weng...era-championne_post1480691/blogpostfull.shtml )
     
    Last edited: Aug 15, 2012

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