Super Bowl LII

Discussion in 'NFL' started by Shadowlight, Jan 23, 2018.

  1. Shadowlight

    Shadowlight Master

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    I wrote about this subject a year or two ago. The 40 yard dash is an artificial and random event and does not give an accurate reading on speed. In fact most all of the tests they use at the combine are not true indicators of athletic feats. That would include the vertical leap.

    The best way to measure athleticism is to use standard Olympic events. Want to test leaping ability then have them perform the high jump and or long jump. Want to test their sprinting ability then have them run the 100 meters or at the very least 100 yards which used to be a measuring stick for wide receivers back in the 60's. Want to test their strength then have them do Olympic type weightlifting and or have them throw a shot put.
    For endurance have them run a marathon or the steeple chase. How about the hurdles for agility?

    Football players are generally not running 40 yards or even 20 or 10 yards. Yes they could cover that amount of space on any given play but unlike track and field there is more than just "one take." There are many plays so a player is running and running and running far greater than 40 yards especially when one team controls the ball. For running speed only the 100 yard dash will give you a better idea because during the course of a game a player is constantly running so any 40 yard dash time will be skewered by the fact that their endurance isn't being factored in when they run these Combine 40 yard dashes.

    One example of many. If a CB has just covered the equivalent of 100 yards over the course of three consecutive plays doesn't it stand to reason that the 40 yard dash time he ran in a controlled artificial environment while he was as fresh as a daisy doesn't translate to a player running many more yards with just minimal breaks in between plays. The 40 yard dash and the vertical leap verge on gimmickry and young black youths concentrate on these one trick pony feats at a very early age.

    Now a player that runs a fast 40 could run a fast 100 yard dash as well but there is no guarantee .

    Ultimately there is way too much reliance on the 40 yard dash and at the end of the day as it relates to football doesn't provide an accurate enough measurement of speed as far as I am concerned. Heck baseball players even have a longer sprint than football players as the 60 yard dash is the staple measuring stick for speed. And baseball fields are a lot smaller than football fields.
     
  2. La France Blanche

    La France Blanche Mentor

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    The '85 Bears had 32 Whites and 21 blacks. I don't think there's been a majority-White Super Bowl championship team since then. The NFL went caste hard and fast in the mid-1980s.
     
  3. MrPoon

    MrPoon Mentor

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    I was watching the 1974 super bowl on YouTube and noticed that the wide receivers were in 3 point stances. When did that stop? Lots of white skill players....corners, running backs, receivers, safeties, d linemen.
     
  4. Ambrose

    Ambrose Master

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    Super Bowl brings massive security resources to Minneapolis

    MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — Concrete barriers and chain-link fencing are going up around the site of the Super Bowl in downtown Minneapolis, where a contingent of local, state and national agencies is working to ensure that the game and dozens of related events are safe.

    The downtown location of the Feb. 4 title game has presented challenges for authorities, who have had to get creative as they carved a secure perimeter around businesses and a major hospital near U.S. Bank Stadium. But it’s not the first time the Super Bowl has dealt with the challenges of a city center, and authorities who have spent roughly two years thinking about every possible scenario say they are prepared.

    “We’re ready for anything that may come our way,” Minneapolis Police Commander Scott Gerlicher said. “It’s about not just feeling safe, but making sure people are in fact safe.”

    Gerlicher, whose department is overseeing security, said this Super Bowl will have the largest deployment of federal resources yet. That’s because Minneapolis has a relatively small department — less than 900 officers compared with the roughly 5,000 in Houston, where last year’s game was held — and needed more personnel.

    Dozens of other cities are sending officers too, and the Minnesota National Guard has been activated. An additional 10,000 volunteers are being trained to spot suspicious activity.

    Visitors can expect to see increased police patrols, bomb-sniffing dogs, helicopters, officers in tactical gear, and that chain-link and concrete fence around U.S. Bank Stadium.

    Plenty of technology such as motion detectors, closed-circuit cameras and air particle sensors will be operating behind the scenes. Giant machines are being used to scan shipments to the stadium. Extra security cameras will be sprinkled around the city, and NFL-sanctioned events will have metal detectors. Teams will be in place to react to whatever comes up.

    “Our efforts are to make sure that it’s a warm and inviting atmosphere. But make no mistake about it — there are tons of watchful eyes from the law enforcement and public safety sectors,” said Alex Khu, special agent in charge of Homeland Security Investigations in Minnesota and the federal coordinator for this year’s Super Bowl.

    Because of the dense area around the stadium, some security screening will be happening off-site. They also had to figure out how to secure Super Bowl Live, a largely free-flowing, 10-day outdoor event that’s open to the public. Meanwhile, some events are being held in nearby St. Paul and at the Mall of America in Bloomington, while team hotels, practice facilities — and transportation to and from — also must be secured.

    Jeffrey Miller, former senior vice president and chief security officer for the NFL, said each host city faces different challenges. In Minneapolis, perhaps the biggest is the weather. He said security staff may need to be doubled or tripled to keep people from being exposed to dangerous elements for a prolonged time.

    “That’s a challenge, and it’s a costly one you don’t have if playing in San Diego,” he said.

    Miller said setting up a perimeter around a downtown venue is more difficult than setting one up around a stadium surrounded by parking lots. Architects, engineers and other experts are part of the planning. For fans, he said, there are advantages to being downtown and close to the action.

    “The NFL is really good at trying to balance security needs with the fan engagement part of the equation,” he said.

    Miller said officials also have to take into account recent world events — meaning the possibility of a terror attack.

    Joe Rivers, assistant special agent in charge of the FBI in Minneapolis, said a threat assessment for the game has included analyzing attacks around the world. He cited the May bombing of an Ariana Grande concert in Manchester, England, the Oct. 1 shooting at an outdoor concert in Las Vegas and the Oct. 31 vehicle attack on a New York City bike path. Without providing detail, Rivers said authorities used those attacks to shape their plans.

    Local history must also be considered. Minneapolis has seen dozens of young men travel to Somalia or Syria to join extremist groups over the past decade. There also has been a stabbing attack at a central Minnesota mall and a more recent bombing of a local mosque.

    “It’s impossible for us to ignore the historical cases that we’ve had here and the type of threats ... that we’ve addressed,” Rivers said.

    He said there is no credible threat to the Super Bowl, and authorities are continuing to gather intelligence. Rivers said his main concerns are low-tech threats, such as someone driving a vehicle into or firing a weapon at a crowd.

    “Not to alarm anyone, but it’s not hard to come by weapons in this country and with where our venues are located and things like that, there’s no way we can possibly secure every single floor of every single building that can see a venue or can overlook a crowd, so those are concerns, yes,” he said.

    Fans attending Super Bowl events can help by staying vigilant. In addition to calling 911, people who see something suspicious can call 1-800-CALL-FBI. In the event of something like the Boston Marathon bombing, the FBI has created a website where witnesses can upload videos and photos so the FBI can gather evidence quickly.

    “Obviously, the best case scenario is that we hope that we do all of this ... and no one never even realizes all the legwork that went into it on the front end,” Rivers said. “They just show up, have a good time, and leave and go home.”


    https://apnews.com/c10beefba5644b0e...ngs-massive-security-resources-to-Minneapolis
     
  5. Quiet Speed

    Quiet Speed Mentor

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    Funny you should mention that. I was watching some old Kenny Stabler/Raiders highlights the other day which included the time period you're referencing. Wide receiver Mike Siani, who I had completely forgotten about, was using a three-point stance and Fred Biletnikoff would stand upright with hands on hips. At some point, Siani used the upright stance. Back in those days watching the Raiders was a halfway pleasant experience.
     
  6. Extra Point

    Extra Point Hall of Famer

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    None of this would be necessary if America was still the way it was in the 1950s.
     
  7. Don Wassall

    Don Wassall Administrator Staff Member

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    Gronk has been practicing the past few days so he's almost a sure thing to pass the concussion protocol and play in the big game.
     
  8. TwentyTwo

    TwentyTwo Master

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    NFC Pro Bowl Offense started 8 white players today ....WR Thielen; TE Randolph; FB Juszczyk; Brees + 4 O-Lineman
    AFC Defense starts only DB Eric Weddle

    Thielen TD!
    Announcer says "he Couldn't even get a scholarship to Minnesota St.-Mankato...now he's a Pro Bowler"
     
  9. Westside

    Westside Hall of Famer

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    Not watch the ProBowl, but glanced at BSPN site. Harrison Smith with a 79 yard pick six.
     
  10. Shadowlight

    Shadowlight Master

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    I saw it nifty stuff from Harrison Smith. The NHL All Star game is on at the same time as the Pro Bowl and neither one is essential viewing.
    They are half tackling here.

    Speaking of which, bored as hell last night and not in the mood for the night college basketball games I feasted on the NFL network's half hour Super Bowl highlight shows starting with the first. These things are a kick. They changed the voice of the narrator after a decade or so but I love the way he and the later guys describe the action and flow of the games.

    Good history lesson as you see the white skill players start to peel off as the years go by. Defensive backs too.

    But there is one thing I noticed and while not a scientific study it was rather obvious. First I should say they were very rugged back then. WOW. But I didn't see ANY HEAD SHOTS. Everybody tackled with proper techniques with wrapping up and shoulder forward hits. It was all done in a rugged manner but nothing cheap shot about it.

    I suspect the rise of the number of black DB's coincided with the explosion of cheap head shots. The Vikings/Raiders SB featured S Jack Tatum and I suspect it was around this time that the seeds of cheap shots were planted. Cheap head shots became a staple at some point in the 90's but perhaps someone here can enlighten me on the evolution of skull shots and what years it become common place.

    I do recall that "spearing" going way back would get a defender a 15 yard penalty.
     
  11. Extra Point

    Extra Point Hall of Famer

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    Yes, unless you're black and spear Jordy Nelson in the ribs in a playoff game. In that case the referees and the league will do absolutely nothing.

    Intentionally injuring white players without consequences is part of black privilege.
     
  12. Extra Point

    Extra Point Hall of Famer

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    Yes, and how many Thielens are out there that never got a chance because they're white? A lot!
     
  13. booth

    booth Mentor

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    Chris Long stated that he would not go to White House if Eagles win the Super Bowl. I don't think he has to worry about going.
     
  14. FootballDad

    FootballDad Hall of Famer

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    Big deal. He didn't go last year after the Patriots won, and I don't think anyone missed him.
     
  15. Westside

    Westside Hall of Famer

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    Chris Long has no doubt replaced Carson Palmer was the most disliked player here. He is becoming immensely annoying, to say the least.
     
  16. MrPoon

    MrPoon Mentor

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  17. Thrashen

    Thrashen Hall of Famer

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    Last night, NFL Network broadcasted a program called "Superbowl Opening Night" in which Deion Sanders interviewed Danny Amendola. During said interview, Sanders asked Amendola a highly fascinating question:

    "Yourself, Hogan, Edelman...it seems like Tom goes to the people and says 'give me that guy, give me that guy, give me that guy.' And you guys all fit the same description. What is it about the type of guys they want?"

    Deion was essentially asking Danny why all of NE's receivers are white, but he didn't phrase the question in a negative way whatsoever other than implying that Brady is secretly telling the coaches and management that he wants white WR's. At the end of the interview, Sanders closed by saying the following to Amendola: "You scored a touchdown in both Superbowls [49 and 51]. I want you to have two this week!"



    Since entering broadcasting, Deion's vicious anti-white remarks have long been chronicled in the "ESPN Jerk" thread here at CF. However, I remember after NE won last years SB, Sanders said something like "Edelman, Amendola, Hogan...the NFL has no answer for this group of receivers over the past several years." Like many other black commentators that were former players, Deion's commentary on white athletes is wildly inconsistent.
     
  18. Don Wassall

    Don Wassall Administrator Staff Member

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    Too bad Danny didn't say, "Because we're quicker, and most importantly because we're much smarter. Wide receiver is our position." Haha, instant career ender, but I imagine the Patriots could win ten Super Bowls in a row with only White receivers and it would change nothing in the NFL. Just continued feigned slack-jawed incomprehension and more mumbling about how all the credit goes to the quarterback and head coach.

    I agree that Deion is unpredictable when it comes to racial matters. He and someone like Michael Irvin are quicker to compliment White players, but if you listen carefully to the childish jibbering in the studio that goes on in the background when game highlights are being shown, Sanders routinely makes pro-black comments or sly anti-White ones about certain players and positions.
     
  19. chris371

    chris371 Mentor

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    I wouldnt waste any thought on what Sanders says.... i estimate that he just rambles his ghetto crap like most borderline brainless affoletes without there being any purpose or reasoning behind it. Like a roll of the dice, the weak minded ramblings are largely inconsistant.
     
  20. Don Wassall

    Don Wassall Administrator Staff Member

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    Some blacks are quick to compliment because they see an "equivalence" between Whites WRs and RBs and black QBs -- if there's more black QBs then it's hypocritical to not welcome the occasional White receiver or running back. However there is nothing remotely comparable between the two -- black QBs are heavily recruited and developed in high school and college, while Whites are discouraged almost from the time they're born from playing the "Whites need not apply" positions.

    If receiver, running back, or any defensive position ever does start to trend White the way tight end has, blacks wouldn't be able to handle it. After 35 years of "owning" those positions, they think the entitlement should continue permanently, having little understanding of the dynamics of the Caste System and the agenda behind it.
     
  21. Thrashen

    Thrashen Hall of Famer

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    NFL Network's "Superbowl Opening Night" was hosted by a diverse crew of four black former NFL players: Deion Sanders, Willie McGinest, Michael Irvin, and Steve Smith. Irvin wore some sort of brown, velvet-like suit that made me wonder if his chronic addiction to crack cocaine was still plaguing him. For the most part, the Negroes kept their TNB in check and tried their darndest to conjugate verbs properly. Sanders was on his best behavior, but the question he asked Amendola was likely an attempt to "bait" Danny into a discussion about New England's long-standing proclivity for white WR's (Morey, Looker, McCready, Farris, Gessner, Dwight, Welker, Ventrone, Farnham, Edelman, Ebert, Amendola, Collie, Moe, Hogan, Reilly, and Hollister) that have been on the active roster or PS in the Brady/Belichick era. Of course, only a handful of these guys actually caught regular season passes and even fewer became superstars.

    Team Diversity:

    [​IMG]
     
  22. chris371

    chris371 Mentor

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    Hahaha @ conjugating verbs correctly. Good One ;) Amazing how an entire nation ignores so many elephants in the room.
     
  23. MrPoon

    MrPoon Mentor

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    Saw this and it just pisses me off how they lump Hogan and Amendola as if they are even remotely the same type of receiver. Skin color and BRAINS seem to be the only similarities.
     
  24. Thrashen

    Thrashen Hall of Famer

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    I agree that Hogan, Edelman, and Amendola are 3 very different players. My observations...

    Edelman is 5-10, 200 lbs. He's clearly the bulkiest and most compact of the trio. Hogan is 6-1, 220 lbs. He has a muscular upper body, but is otherwise very thin. Amendola is 5-11, 190 lbs. His frame is noticeably smaller overall than Edelman and Hogan.

    Hogan has elite straight-line speed, but is a "long strider" who lacks quickness. Edelman has elite quickness, and while fast, isn't a straight line "burner." Amendola has amazing short-area bust and possess elite route-running.

    Amendola has great hands, but Hogan and Edelman are prone to bobbling the ball and drops.

    Edelman has a real "leadership" quality about him and is the fiery, passionate tough guy of the group. Hogan and Amendola are more "finesse" players.

    But they're all white, so to the Caste System (with its many disciples and DWF minions), they're all the same!

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jan 31, 2018
  25. Thrashen

    Thrashen Hall of Famer

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    Last weekend, the Pats released an injury report and I didn't see Rex Burkhead's name, so I assume he is healthy for the Superbowl after essentially missing the entire playoffs...

    [​IMG]

    If he's used, he'd be the first white RB to appear in the SB since Danny Woodhead in 2011-2012, where he scored a receiving TD...



    Of course, I'm hoping to see Rex have a big day on the ground and through the air and for Gronk, Hogan, and Amendola to all score TD's and have many receptions/yards. It won't be easy, as the Eagles' front seven can rush the passer with reckless abandon, they have great cover corners in Mills and Darby, and their LB's are decent in coverage, too. Honestly, the Pats have played very poorly at times in playoffs throughout the "Second Dynasty" (2014-present). They've overcome some massive 4th quarter deficits (Baltimore in the 2015 Divisional Round, Seattle in Superbowl 49, Atlanta in Superbowl 51, and Jacksonville in the 2018 AFC Title Game) to secure wins when the situation appeared to be dire. Throughout the entire Brady/Belichick era, every single Superbowl game has been an improbable, razor-thin loss or a heart-pounding, last-second victory. The only game that wasn't incredibly close was Superbowl XXXIX against the Eagles, which they could've easily lost (or at least went OT) if McNabb had been able to drive his team down the field on the final drive.

    I could see the Pats dominating the Eagles just as easily as I could see the Pats getting blown out. With this team, you never know...
     
    Last edited: Jan 31, 2018

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