Christophe Lemaitre "White Lightning" 9.92 and 19.80!

Discussion in 'Track & Field' started by white lightning, Jul 26, 2008.

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  1. j41181

    j41181 Master

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    Someone in YouTube made this comment...

    "In order for him to live up to his potential I think he must change his training regimen to include more 400m style workouts as stated before. It worked for Tyson Gay the reason 44.89 its his PB for the 400m he ran it this past summer in a meet in Texas. It allowed him to break a long standing world mark in the 200m dash straightaway 19.41 formerly held by Tommie Smith going back to the 1960's."
     
  2. white lightning

    white lightning Hall of Famer Staff Member

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    I think one or two 400 races would help him. Nothing more than that. It's only to build a little bit of additional speed endurance. For the most part, he needs to work on his form. He still tends to not stay straight many times while sprinting and his arms needs some work. His start will be helped as his weight lifting program helps him to put on some muscle. He simply does not have the adequate strength to get consistant starts a the moment. Next year will be a big year because he needs to continue to take another step forward. Once you get to this level, you have to fight for every little hundreth of a second. He needs to get to be perfect in all phases of sprinting. There is no room for errors when you are sprinting against the elite sprinters of the world. They are constantly trying to improve as well so Christophe needs to train even harder than them without burning himself out. It's a very fine line. I feel that Shirvo left his best on the track while training. He simply over trained in my opinion.
     
  3. waterbed

    waterbed Mentor

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    I think 400 meters wouldn't help him much in the 100 because his deceleration is really good already.he decelerates only from 0.85 to 0.86-0.87 on the very end.Over 200 meters it would help him but over 100 meters he can hold his speed one of the best if not the best already in the world.I hope he takes it easy in the gym becuase he is naturally skinny and he would probably never be really big, so don't let him do to much becuase of small results.Usian Bolt is an exception he went from really skinny to average or even over average muscle mass for a men his height, and he said he doesn't like the gym and doesn't do much weight training....
     
  4. Jimmy Chitwood

    Jimmy Chitwood Hall of Famer

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    unless, of course, you're a Jamaican. [​IMG]"somehow" those guys (even in their late twenties/early thirties, both male and female) can shave off entire tenths-of-a-second in a single offseason and it's just attributed to natural talent. oh, and yams. we can't forget the yams.
     
  5. LoLy

    LoLy Guru

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    Lemaitre will continue his study in Engeneering for the next four years. He has signed an agreement with a university to have a special program in order for him to continu his training. the brain and the legs. not bad !

    http://www.asathle.org/index.php?mod=voirnews&id=481
     
  6. Bk21

    Bk21 Guru

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    actually not good news.. there are tons of engineers but only one master of the sprint, let's hope it doesn't disturb his athletic preparation..

    infos of the week-end:
    Christophe won the 4x100 and 4x200 France clubs championship with his club of Aix les bains
    Meritt is suspended for 21 months
    James Fuchs, the inventor of the actual weight throw technique has passed away
     
  7. trackster

    trackster Mentor

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    Christophe ran last weekend? I didn't know. Are there any videos available?
     
  8. Bk21

    Bk21 Guru

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  9. LoLy

    LoLy Guru

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    last VID from his university

    [TUBE]aTG84QUAJaw[/TUBE]

    his coach said it's not a problem. it's even better because that will change his mind of training.

    He said overtraining can drive high level runners to be less motivated, and so less performant.
     
  10. Bk21

    Bk21 Guru

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    Ok thanks Loly great video

    (for the others, it is said that he does 4hours of training per day)

    Other news about him: he was nominated for the title of Ahtlete of the year (among 10), the ceremony will be held on the 18th of novemberEdited by: bk21
     
  11. freddie

    freddie Guru

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    The video posted by LoLy (thanks) had a couple of clips of Christophe in the gym. I note that his style for the leg extension and lat pull down was not only poor but old-fashioned! He did lat pulls behind his head (preferred method is now infront) and this leg extension had no explosion and stopped well short of a full movement. He could simply have been doing it for the cameras but I found it very disturbing.
     
  12. the argie

    the argie Guru

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  13. LoLy

    LoLy Guru

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    I really think it was for the cameras. look at the weight he's lifting.
     
  14. freddie

    freddie Guru

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    Thanks LoLy for your reassurance. I feel better now.
     
  15. white lightning

    white lightning Hall of Famer Staff Member

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  16. white lightning

    white lightning Hall of Famer Staff Member

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  17. LoLy

    LoLy Guru

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  18. white lightning

    white lightning Hall of Famer Staff Member

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    <DIV =contenu>
    <DIV =titraille>
    <DIV =titre>
    <DIV lang=en =p _mstHash="28733354">Christophe Lemaitre, triple champion of Europe this summer in Barcelona (100 m, 200 m and 4 x 100 m), is not known on what distance will focus the next season, marked by the world-2011, in Daegu (South Korea) from August 27 to September 4.
    <DIV =texte>
    <DIV =p _mstHash="47694868">"I don't know yet if this summer I concentrate on 100 or 200 m. I have more than 200 m. potential if I pass under 20 seconds, it will be able to do so." "But I also have something to prove 100 m," said Sunday the 20th anniversary of his passing in Monaco for the awards of the International Federation Savoyard.
    <DIV =p _mstHash="63358334">"If I walk down regularly under 10 seconds (about 100 m) or more and I feel that I can access the final (competition), it will be more interesting." "Race Queen and one that I prefer because explosive and intense," said the sprinter who started its preparation in is resulting in a dozen weekly hours Aix-les-Bains.
    <DIV lang=en =p _mstHash="6458569">Holder France record since this summer (9.97) intends to do a few appearances this winter in the classroom.
    <DIV =p _mstHash="41828761">"Normally I would not much racing and they will be spread out." Five or six including the France Championships and European in Bercy (over 60 m). "I will certainly make one or two 200 m," said Lemaitre, which aims to be at the level of his personal records (6.55 60 m) and 20.83 on 200 m.
    <DIV lang=en =p _mstHash="13463541">Returning to the season it was crowned "European athlete 2010", Lemaitre felt he had "not missed much" for the year is perfect.
    <DIV =p _mstHash="55483545">"It may be necessary that I make better chronométriquement." I had better legs. But for various reasons, I couldn't. "Riéti (Italy), for example, I was a bit sick and in Barcelona (European Championships), I thought that it was supportive but I am remained stuck in the starts", has explained.
     
  19. jayo1980

    jayo1980 Newbie

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    their is no limit of 100m race , not as long as there is new discoveries been made in the biotechnology industry.


    this new body shape has never been very sucessful at 100m before
    what has changed , has body evovled in a generation .

    only thing that has changed is knowledge of human physiology .


    if it seems to good to be true ,usually is ;
    and we all know about jamaicans but i would have to include
    lamaitre in this aswell ,
    why has there been no sprinters like him before with his basic
    training , technique and strength .


    i personnally dont care how he is fast but that he is and changes stereotypes
    and brings back people to sprinting but doesnt change the fact
    that something is up .
     
  20. jayo1980

    jayo1980 Newbie

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    Gene doping: Genetically Modified Olympians? | The Economist




    Genetically Modified Olympians?
    On the eve of the Beijing Olympics, we examine the prospect of athletes using gene therapy to enhance their performanceâ€"and of catching them if they try
    Jul 31st 2008 | from PRINT EDITION

    .FOR as long as people have vied for sporting glory, they have also sought shortcuts to the champion's rostrum. Often, those shortcuts have relied on the assistance of doctors. After all, most doping involves little more than applying existing therapies to healthy bodies. These days, however, the competition is so intense that existing therapies are not enough. Now, athletes in search of the physiological enhancement they need to take them a stride ahead of their opponents are scanning medicine's future, as well as its present. In particular, they are interested in a field known as gene therapy.

    Gene therapy works by inserting extra copies of particular genes into the body. These extra copies, known as "transgenes"Â, may cover for a broken gene or regulate gene activity. Though gene therapy has yet to yield a reliable medical treatment, more than 1,300 clinical trials are now under way. As that number suggests, the field is reckoned to be full of promise.

    As far as sport is concerned, the top transgene on the list, according to Jim Rupert, an anti-doping expert at the University of British Columbia, is the gene for erythropoietin. EPO, as it is known for short, is a hormone that regulates the production of red blood cells. It is already available as a drug (it was one of the first products of biotechnology companies in the late 1980s), and it has been used widely in endurance sports such as long-distance cycling. But if an athlete's body could be stimulated to make more of it that wouldâ€"from the athlete's point of viewâ€"be better than taking it in drug form.



    No dopes

    The reason is that EPO, like most performance-enhancing drugs, is banned. However, bans work only when they are enforced, and that requires a test which can distinguish synthetic EPO from the natural hormone made by an athlete's body. At the moment, this is possible. The EPO from a biotechnology company's vats has a slightly different chemical structure from the natural sort. But the evidence suggests that EPO produced as a result of gene therapy will be far harder to distinguish.

    In fact, EPO doping may already have happened. In 2006, during the trial of Thomas Springstein, a German coach accused of doping his underage charges, it transpired that Repoxygen, an experimental gene-therapy product containing the gene for EPO, was already making the rounds on the black market. Repoxygen causes a controlled release of EPO, but only when the body senses a lack of oxygen. Or at least it does so in mice.

    Whether black-market Repoxygen has won any races is unknown. But several other genetic therapies being tested in mice also look as if they may interest the sort of men and women who feel their athletic performance needs a little boost.

    Like EPO, vascular endothelial growth factor spurs red-blood-cell formation and thus helps to supply tissues with oxygen. The gene that encodes this protein is the subject of several medical studies, and is thus a prime candidate for sporting use.

    IGF-1 is also a growth factorâ€"though it promotes brawniness in muscle rather than the production of blood cells. Inject the gene that encodes it into a particular muscle and you can affect that muscle and no other. Such specificity might be of interest to people like tennis players and javelin throwers. Meanwhile, a gene called MSTN encodes a protein called myostatin, which limits rather than enhances muscle development. In this case, therefore, the doping is designed to switch the gene off. The result is what have been nicknamed "Schwarzenegger" mice.

    Once brawny muscles have been acquired, whether licitly or illicitly, other genes might then be used to tune their activity. Tweaking PPAR-delta, for instance, alters the way muscles obtain their energy. The individual fibres that comprise a muscle can run in one of two modes. In slow-twitch mode they burn fat, and are less prone to fatigue. In fast-twitch mode they burn sugar. That makes them prone to fatigue, but is useful for delivering short bursts of power. Both modes are valuable to athletes, but in different types of event. The ability to make muscle fibres specialise in one mode or the other would thus be of great benefit to unscrupulous coaches. PPAR-delta controls the switch.

    Finally, animal studies on the genes for natural pain-killers called endorphins suggest that these could be used to limit the perception of painâ€"another desirable trait for athletes. That might consign the adage "no pain, no gain" to the history books.

    There is thus a lot of potential. And althoughâ€"the Springstein incident asideâ€"there is no evidence that any of these techniques have made their way into real athletes, the authorities are taking no chances.

    The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA), sensed several years ago which way the wind was blowing. In 2003 it issued a proclamation banning "the non-therapeutic use of genes, genetic elements and/or cells that have the capacity to enhance athletic performance"Â. It followed this by putting its money where its mouth was. Since much of gene doping's allure derives from its alleged undetectability, WADA committed $7.8mâ€"a quarter of its research budget for 2004-07â€"to 21 projects intended to develop ways of detecting it. Now another $6.5m is up for grabs.

    Broadly, there are two ways of spending this money usefully. The direct approach focuses on improving ways of detecting differences between truly natural and "therapeutically enhanced"Â proteins or, failing that, on detecting the "vector"Â used to inject the transgenes into the places where they will operate. Such vectors are often particular sorts of virus.

    The indirect approach seeks second-hand signs of the transgene or its vector. Viruses, for example, may produce a characteristic immune response that can be detected. Meanwhile the transgenes themselves may alter the body's proteome (the set of proteins active in it at any given time) or its metabolome (a list of all the by-products of the chemical reactions that go on in each cell). Changes to either of these "-omes"Â can, in principle, be detected in blood or urine. What is needed are points of comparison. This requires working out the typical "biosignatures"Â of elite sportsmen as a group, or indeed of each individual, as a baseline.


    Testing times

    Whether gene doping will make its debut in Beijing remains to be seenâ€"or perhaps not, if it is as hard to detect as its protagonists hope. Theodore Friedmann of the University of California, San Diego, who heads WADA's Gene Doping Panel, reckons it probably won't happen this time. He does not think there is, yet, a form of gene therapy that could easily be used to enhance performance. As for Dr Rupert, he says, "I would be surprised. But I have been surprised before." It would be ironic if the first successful application of gene therapy were to people who are among the fittest on the planet. But it is possible.
     
  21. jayo1980

    jayo1980 Newbie

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    here is paragraph interested in,




    Tweaking PPAR-delta, for instance, alters the way muscles obtain their energy. The individual fibres that comprise a muscle can run in one of two modes. In slow-twitch mode they burn fat, and are less prone to fatigue. In fast-twitch mode they burn sugar. That makes them prone to fatigue, but is useful for delivering short bursts of power. Both modes are valuable to athletes, but in different types of event. The ability to make muscle fibres specialise in one mode or the other would thus be of great benefit to unscrupulous coaches. PPAR-delta controls the switch.







    Skeletal muscles come in two basic types: type I, or slow twitch, and type II, or fast twitch. Slow-twitch fibers rely on oxidative (aerobic) metabolism and have abundant mitochondria that generate the stable, long-lasting supplies of adenosine triphosphate, or ATP, needed for long distance. (For more on muscle fiber metabolism, see synopsis titled "A Skeletal Muscle Protein That Regulates Endurance"Â￾) Fast-twitch fibers, which produce ATP through anaerobic glycolysis, generate rapid, powerful contractions but fatigue easily. Top-flight sprinters have up to 80% type II fibers while long-distance runners have up to 90% type I fibers.



    done hijacking thread ,
     
  22. white lightning

    white lightning Hall of Famer Staff Member

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    To even consider Christophe being on anything is foolish in my opinion. I know teenage girls who have better strength and athletic builds than him. Look at how big Bolt has gotten. Take a look at him4 or 5 years ago. Should Bolt get bigger, yes. NOT THAT BIG THOUGH! Why do you think Bolt and Powell love to flex so much at the starting line? I'm sure it's just the yams though! Yeah right.

    Back to Lemaitre. He is going to take it to another level in the next couple of years. I don't want to see him get to big to soon. Let him progress naturally. His body is at the age where he will fill out just fine. He just has to hit the weights hard and eat better. I hope they have a dietician and weightlifting/plyometrics specialist to help out. I'm sure they do. My other wish is that his school never interferes with him putting in the necessary time to take it to another level.

    The summer of 2011 cannot get here soon enough. What a year it could be!Edited by: white lightning
     
  23. white lightning

    white lightning Hall of Famer Staff Member

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    I don't think this video has ever been posted here. It is the semi final heat from the 2010 European Championships. Lemaitre runs a 10.06 into a negative -1.2 wind! This could have easily been a new p.b. for him if you turn the wind around. What is also impressive is that E. DiGregorio take 2nd ina new personal best time of 10.17! Think about that. DiGregorio ran a p.b. into a strong wind. Not bad for an older short italian guy towards the last few years of his career. Maybe he can put up one or two more good years. Collio still runs good. Cerutti should be back to form this season. As for Lemaitre. He is simply incredible!

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S6MMHZemHjQ&amp;feature=grec_indexEdited by: white lightning
     
  24. the argie

    the argie Guru

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  25. white lightning

    white lightning Hall of Famer Staff Member

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    Thank you to our new member the argie. Welcome to the board. Are from France as we have many people from Europe that post here. We even have a few guys from Australia. The board is growing all the time. Excellent video but can anyone translate it to english. I'm curious to see what they are talking about in the weight room by the computer? Any help to french speaking members is greatly appreciated. Thanks.
     
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