Caste Football Civil War

Discussion in 'Happy Hour' started by Average American, Aug 26, 2013.

  1. Average American

    Average American Mentor

    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2012
    Messages:
    703
    Any other Civil War (W.B.T.S.) buffs/students here (?)

    I'm curious who your favorite Civil War personalities are.. battles, events you find most intriguing. Any re-enactors, or regular visitors to local battlefields.

    Personal takes on the politics/ramifications of the War (?)

    The Civil War & Reconstruction era is a subject I've been into my whole life. (for whatever it's worth :yo: )
     
  2. Charles Martel

    Charles Martel Hall of Famer

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2007
    Messages:
    7,654
    http://www.civilwar.org/battlefields/fredericksburg.html?tab=facts

    The Battle of Fredericksburg
    , fought December 11-15, 1862, was one of the largest of the Civil War. It featured the first major opposed river crossing in American military history. Union and Confederate troops fought in the streets of Fredericksburg, the Civil War’s first urban combat. And with nearly 200,000 combatants, no other Civil War battle featured a larger concentration of soldiers.

    Burnside’s plan at Fredericksburg was to use the nearly 60,000 men in Maj. Gen. William B. Franklin’s Left Grand Division to crush Lee’s southern flank on Prospect Hill while the rest of his army held Longstreet and the Confederate First Corps in position at Marye’s Heights.

    The Union army’s main assault against Stonewall Jackson produced initial success and held the promise of destroying the Confederate right, but lack of reinforcements and Jackson’s powerful counterattack stymied the effort. Both sides suffered heavy losses (totaling 9,000 in killed, wounded and missing) with no real change in the strategic situation.

    In the meantime, Burnside’s “diversion” against veteran Confederate soldiers behind a stone wall produced a similar number of casualties but most of these were suffered by the Union troops. Wave after wave of Federal soldiers marched forth to take the heights, but each was met with devastating rifle and artillery fire from the nearly impregnable Confederate positions. Confederate artillerist Edward Porter Alexander’s earlier claim that “a chicken could not live on that field” proved to be entirely prophetic this bloody day.

    As darkness fell on a battlefield strewn with dead and wounded, it was abundantly clear that a signal Confederate victory was at hand. The Army of the Potomac had suffered nearly 13,300 casualties, nearly two-thirds of them in front of Mayre’s Heights. By comparison, Lee’s army had suffered some 4,500 losses. Robert E. Lee, watching the great Confederate victory unfolding from his hilltop command post exclaimed, “It is well that war is so terrible, or we should grow too fond of it.”

    Roughly six weeks after the Battle of Fredericksburg, President Lincoln removed Burnside from command of the Army of the Potomac.
     
  3. dwid

    dwid Hall of Famer

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2008
    Messages:
    4,098
    Location:
    Louisiana
    just a depressing war when studying it.
     
  4. Charles Martel

    Charles Martel Hall of Famer

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2007
    Messages:
    7,654
    Abraham Lincoln was a warmonger who caused hundreds of thousands of men to suffer and die, yet he's remembered as a hero.

    I have great respect for people like Robert E Lee and Stonewall Jackson who defended their state of Virginia against Lincoln's armies.
     
  5. Carolina Speed

    Carolina Speed Master

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2011
    Messages:
    3,563
    That's easy, first battle at Bull Run. Those yankee boys thought they were going take us rebel boys with ease. To their surprise we, under the leadership of Stonewall Jackson stood our ground despite being at a disadvantage. The union retreated and the rout was on.

    Some believe had the rebel army continued instead of delaying it's advancement over the Potomac River, the south would have taken Washington and possibly won the war very quickly.
     
  6. Colonel_Reb

    Colonel_Reb Hall of Famer

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2005
    Messages:
    14,000
    Location:
    The Deep South
    I'd agree with that assessment of First Manassas (as The South referred to it), and it is one of the first "what ifs" of The War. I'm interested in that period of time on a number of levels. My opinions on it and the connections I see to anti-White discrimination and the caste system can be found on numerous posts and threads from years of CF past. Of course there is also my avatar, which says something about who I am. :icon_mrgreen: Looking back on it, I wish it had never happened, as my signature also indicates. The results of it have been an overall negative on our people and our culture (White Americans in general, and especially White Christian Southern men).
     
  7. joegoofinoff

    joegoofinoff Guru

    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2013
    Messages:
    196
    Gentlemen, am studying the Reconstruction period. A far more important era than the war itself I think. I hope to give a lecture on it in 2015, ( 2 lectures actually - can't do it in only one). I'm getting my information from 90% writings of 1865-1920 or so by the people who lived and participated in those events. Vast subject.

    I'm disgusted with the college lecturers I see on youtube. If they're not actually lying about Reconstruction, they're leaving out important factors of certain events, which actually make their statements lies. They're not teaching. They're propagandizing. That's not the role of a teacher.

    joegoofinoff.
     
  8. jaxvid

    jaxvid Hall of Famer

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2004
    Messages:
    7,247
    Location:
    Michigan
    Another time the North was at a disadvantage playing on the South's home field! ;-)

    Bull Run-First Manassas, was a very interesting event. If you read about it the whole thing was run like a football game with fans camped on both sides of the field to cheer on the players. Sad to think about it but it was a much simpler time. The War denigrated into an ugly slaughter for the most part as it was one of the first large scale modern wars.

    I don't understand how millions of northern White men thought it would be a good idea to fight and possibly die to keep people in a union they didn't want to be in. But there's a lot about people I don't understand and that is why I'm facinated by the Civil War like I am the caste system in sports.

    There were two generals I really liked and have read about. Wade Hampton who took over the Southern Cavalry after Jeb Stuart was killed. He was a rich plantation owner who used his own money to raise and arm a cavalry brigade. His own money-those were the days!

    I also admired Winfield Scott Han****, the real hero of Gettysburg whose decisions on the first day of the battle were decisive in the Union victory. If he had not gotten hit with a ball in the hip (an injury that lingered his whole life) the course of the war would have been different as he might have been given command of the Army of the Potomoc instead of having Grant brought in. His subsequent command of the New Orleans area after the War was very controversial in his support for the Southern White man.
     
  9. Average American

    Average American Mentor

    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2012
    Messages:
    703
    Joe,
    nice..
    Have you read 'The Tragic Era' by Claude Bowers (?)
    I have a musty 1929 copy of it.. It's a great assessment of the Reconstruction, that I assume the college profs you're referring to, don't use or recommend.
     
  10. joegoofinoff

    joegoofinoff Guru

    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2013
    Messages:
    196
    Average American, Yes, I've read it. Good book with good info. I'll definitely reference it when I finally give the lecture. Listening to a black Yale Prof. lecturer. Mostly half truths. Says the NY Draft riots were all about the Irish fearing black competition about jobs. While of course, that was a part of it, the riots were about the draft. not jobs. Hard to listen to the guy, but I'm studying lecture methods. I want to have an idea of how to make my presentation.


    joegoofinoff...
     
  11. DixieDestroyer

    DixieDestroyer Hall of Famer

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2007
    Messages:
    9,464
    Location:
    Dixieland
    As for the "war of northern aggression" & this un-reconstructed Southerner...my avatar says it all! ;-)
     
  12. TBProdigy

    TBProdigy Guru

    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2012
    Messages:
    346
    I expected this thread to be about Zeus/Boxingspecialist
     
  13. 'sup bro?

    'sup bro? Newbie

    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2011
    Messages:
    55
    Location:
    New York State
    my grandfather's, great grandfather was shot at appomatox and lived.
     
  14. Average American

    Average American Mentor

    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2012
    Messages:
    703
    Bro..
    was your ancestor Union or Confederate (?)
    I see NY listed in your avatar.. I think Custer was @ Appomattox Station with a group of New Yorkers.
     
  15. 'sup bro?

    'sup bro? Newbie

    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2011
    Messages:
    55
    Location:
    New York State
    my ancestors came from germantown pa and fought with the bucktails.
     
  16. Average American

    Average American Mentor

    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2012
    Messages:
    703
    A group dedicated to preserving battlefield land, conducting a special fund-raising drive during the Civil War's sesquicentennial years :

    http://www.civilwar.org/take-action/campaign-150/

    I've walked around the Gettysburg battlefield a number of times, it's heavy for me, thinking of all our ancestral souls that left the planet there. I'm grateful there are groups preserving sacred ground.
     
  17. Screaming Eagle

    Screaming Eagle Mentor

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2013
    Messages:
    1,341
    I always liked the naval side of the ACW. It always had a Jules Verne/ Steampunk sort of feeling. If the US navy never existed, the South would have won.
     

Share This Page